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  Perspective
KBSI Perspective
For years, scientists have been trying to determine the difference between age related memory loss and Pre-Alzheimer’s and a study a couple of weeks ago has finally found a significant answer. The conditions are separate and now when I lose my car keys it is probably not Alzheimer’s. That’s good news. Actually, according to people much smarter than I am on this subject, it is the protein RbAp48. As we get older our brain produces less of this key protein. The researchers tested the loss on mice and found that older mice seem to have the same brain problems as humans. They have trouble getting through mazes just as I have getting through the mazes of life. On a serious note, when this protein is reduced in mice they become very forgetful. But, the condition is reversible. By boosting RbAp48 the older mice become mentally as strong as the younger mice. Nobel laureate Eric Kandel, who actually headed up this study said, “It’s the best evidence so far that age-related memory loss isn’t the same as early Alzheimer’s.” We all know people who live into their 90’s and even 100 who don’t show much of a cognitive slowdown. Rush H. Limbaugh, the famous Cape Girardeau attorney and grandfather of the national radio commentator worked in his law practice until his death at 104. The research is in the early stages but for most of us, having a senior moment does not necessarily place us in a Pre-Alzheimer’s condition and that is good news.Age Related Memory Loss

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